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10 years of learning from crisis and disruption – Tip 3: Collaborate for Success

10 years of learning from crisis and disruption - Tip 3: Collaborate for Success

Collaborate for Success explores how building relationships with other organisations is important during a crisis.

These handouts are part of our 'Top Tips for Organisations Navigating Crisis and Disruption' series marking the 10th anniversary of the devastating 22nd of February Canterbury, NZ earthquake.

These lessons have been learnt through our years of research and working with organisations to build their resilience. Gathering data from thousands of businesses impacted by the Canterbury earthquakes, by COVID-19, and other national and international disruptive events.

10 years of learnings from crisis and disruption – Tip 2: No Organisation is an Island

10 years of learning from crisis and disruption - Tip 2: No Organisation is an Island

Following on from last week's 'Looking after your Leaders' tip, we have 'No Organisation is an Island' discussing our top tips for dealing with supply chain disruption.

These handouts are part of our 'Top Tips for Organisations Navigating Crisis and Disruption' series marking the 10th anniversary of the devastating 22nd of February Canterbury, NZ earthquake.

These lessons have been learnt through our years of research and working with organisations to build their resilience. Gathering data from thousands of businesses impacted by the Canterbury earthquakes, by COVID-19, and other national and international disruptive events.

 

10 years of learnings from crisis and disruption

10 years of learnings from crisis and disruption - Tip 1: Looking after your Leaders

 

This month marks the 10th anniversary of the devastating 22 February Canterbury, NZ earthquake. To mark this milestone, we are sharing our top tips for organisations navigating crisis and disruption.

We have learned these lessons through our years of research and working with organisations to build their resilience. We have gathered data from thousands of businesses impacted by the Canterbury earthquakes, by COVID-19, and other national and international disruptive events.

We start with a tip very relevant to our current challenging times - looking after your leaders.

Senior Consultant vacancy

Senior Consultant vacancy

Do you have expertise in risk and resilience? Read on to find out more about an opportunity to join our team.
About Us
Resilient Organisations is a niche research and consulting company based in Christchurch. As specialists in organisational resilience we pride ourselves on advancing knowledge and providing solutions that help organisations, industries and communities thrive in any operating environment.
What we do
We work with a broad range of organisations, nationally and internationally, to generate and share knowledge, make organisations future ready, and measure and diagnose resilience issues. In addition to our consulting projects, we undertake a diverse range of public and privately funded research projects.
How we do it
Working collaboratively within the team and with external partners, clients and funders, we produce high quality, evidence-based outputs that make a difference. We are a small team with varied backgrounds, who are passionate about our work and operate according to our shared values. We operate a flexible working environment to promote wellbeing inside and outside of work.
The role
The role will span across a variety of consulting and research projects, providing opportunities for learning and growth. It will require client liaison, project management, qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis, facilitation, problem solving, and preparing and presenting reports. The ability to develop constructive and trusted working relationships is essential. As part of a team, you will have visibility across the organisation and actively contribute to our culture and organisational development.
The ideal candidate for this role will have a tertiary qualification, preferably at post graduate level, along with 5+ years of similar or transferable experience from an analytical, management or consulting role.
To apply for this role, please email your CV and covering letter to [email protected] by 14 February 2021. If you would like further information about the position or Resilient Organisations, contact Richard Ball, [email protected] or phone 027 208 3532.

Electricity Engineers’ Association: Resilience Guide 2020

The Electricity Engineers’ Association have just released their new Resilience Guide.

The guide offers valuable advice to electricity providers on how to prepare their networks and their organisations and respond better to disruptions of any kind; be it earthquakes, volcanic events, pandemics or technology change.

We are thrilled to support the creation of this guide through peer review and discussion with EEA members.

The guide is available for purchase on the EEA website.

EEA-Resilience-Guide-Cover (002)

Assessing urban disaster waste management requirements after volcanic eruptions

Assessing urban disaster waste management requirements after volcanic eruptions

Josh L Hayes, Thomas M Wilson, Charlotte Brown, Natalia I Deligne, Graham Leonard, Jim Cole

International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction   https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijdrr.2020.101935

Abstract

Disasters can generate substantial quantities of disaster waste that must be managed for effective response and recovery. Modelling the potential quantities and types of waste expected after disasters has been widely applied for a variety of hazards (e.g., earthquake, hurricane, flood, tsunami). However, there has been limited consideration of modelling disaster waste as a result of volcanic eruptions, which can generate considerable disaster waste volumes and management issues.

In this work we develop a modelling framework for assessing disaster waste types and quantities after volcanic eruptions affecting urban environments. The framework facilitates quantification of different waste types resulting from damaged buildings and classification of different clean-up zones. The framework is based on vulnerability models and heuristic analysis of the likely waste generated at different damage states from volcanic hazards and is designed to be applied as part of a standard risk modelling procedure. Clean-up zone classifications are developed by identifying key management requirements for different urban land use types. We apply the framework to a case study, using eight eruption scenarios for the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand. Modelling outputs indicate that building debris waste generated under each of these scenarios is likely to be on the order of hundreds of thousands to tens of millions of tonnes. Waste is also likely to be highly mixed in some areas where buildings are heavily damaged and contaminated with volcanic products such as tephra and/or lava, which will complicate disaster waste management activities.

Read the full article

NZ Lifelines Forum 2020

NZ Lifelines Utilities Forum 2020

Sharing knowledge, best practice and lessons learned – through both failures and success – is a crucial part of building resilience.

New Zealand’s annual Lifelines Utilities Forum provides the opportunity for essential infrastructure and service providers to do this. Attendees include utility providers for water supply, wastewater, stormwater, electricity, gas, telecommunications, roads, rail, airports, and ports, as well as researchers, emergency management professionals, and central government agencies.

This year’s Forum was held in Tauranga.  Tauranga City Council shared their long-term program to create resilient infrastructure, emphasising the need to understand all hazards to effectively prioritise investment. A series of presentations looking at climate change risks, recent flood event impacts and water infrastructure failures highlighted the increasing resilience challenges posed by ageing infrastructure, rising sea level, and increasing storm frequency and severity? We presented our work with the Resilience Shift’s Potable Water Primer that outlines challenges and recommendations for creating resilient water supplies.

The current COVID-19 pandemic also featured, with presentations from government agencies and businesses involved in the response. This fascinating session showed some of the serious COVID response challenges and the lesser-known unintended consequences of decisions (such as the closing of butchers leading to welfare issues for pigs as there was nowhere to keep them).

The event is extremely useful and if you work in critical infrastructure in a region or country that does not yet have this kind of event, get started on forming one now.

View the slides from the 2020 Forum.
To ensure you are on the invite list for the next event, get in touch with the organisers at the NZ Lifelines Council.

What did we learn from our scenario testing?

What did we learn from our scenario testing?

If you want to test whether your organisation is prepared for a crisis, just ask “What did we learn from scenario testing our crisis response plans?” If you can’t answer, you are not prepared.

This post was sparked by two recent conversations. One was a request for a business continuity planning template that would satisfy the client’s auditor. The other was an IT auditor saying how most firms fail their IT audits as they have not tested or practiced their business continuity plans. Both these conversations – which were unrelated – highlighted that many businesses view crisis preparedness as a one-off exercise: get a template, fill it out, tick the box, done. Unfortunately, crisis response doesn’t work like that, no matter how good the template.

A risk register or the existence of a plan is not enough. Being prepared requires response capability across the organisation and the ability to adapt, whatever the crisis. It is the ongoing process of planning, practicing, and updating your crisis plans that achieves this.  Practice is critical for everyone involved in the response, including senior leaders and the back-up staff for when key people are unavailable. It helps everyone learn the plan, grows adaptive capability, and will identify unseen weaknesses, giving you the opportunity to address them before a crisis.

Being ready to respond to a crisis need not be hard, but it does require some thought and a commitment to ongoing practice and learning before an event. If you are unsure where to start, want fresh perspectives to make existing plans even better, or want someone to script and run scenario practices to test your plans, then by all means ask for help. But until you can say what you have learned from practicing your plan, no auditor, board, or shareholder should be assured that you have prepared for a crisis, regardless of how good the plan looks.

Get in touch

Give us a call or email us for a free no-obligation chat about your needs and what we can offer.

Tracy Hatton, Resilient Organisations
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Have you captured your lessons learned from COVID-19?

Have you captured the lessons from your organisation’s response to COVID-19?

Our team has been busy working with organisations in a range of sectors to conduct COVID-19 response debriefs.  We are so impressed by the initiative, adaptability, and overall care for wellbeing shown by those we have been working with.

Our facilitated debrief process compiles data from interviews and/or workshops, surveys, and any other data sources. It provides you with recommendations to ensure all the lessons you learned on the fly are embedded in your response processes and any weaker or more challenging response areas are improved.

Capturing lessons is not about identifying failures or enacting blame.  It is about learning through battle and sharpening our tactics and strategy for the next encounter. Capturing lessons learned, before they are lost to memories, is a key part of building crisis response capability.

Get in touch

Give us a call or email us for a free no-obligation chat about your needs and what we can offer.

Tracy Hatton, Resilient Organisations
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Send us an email
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Please enter a valid phone number.
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STARTING TIPS FOR DEBRIEFS

  • Choose a facilitator

    It is better if it is someone not directly involved in the response.

    An external facilitator can help your team navigate any sensitive issues, critically assess their response actions, and challenge group think. Alternatively use a senior manager who is not heavily involved in the response or stretched with other responsibilities.

  • Remember it’s not a blame game

    Capturing lessons is not about identifying failures or enacting blame. It is about learning through experience and sharpening your tactics and strategy for the next encounter.

  • Time it before losing it to memory

    Time the debrief sooner rather than later, while the events are still fresh in everyone’s minds.

  • Ask the right questions

    • What is working?
    • What isn’t working?
    • What do we need to do differently?
             Now?         In the future?
    • How can we ensure we do it differently?
             Now?         In the future?
    • Who will drive the implementation of the changes identified

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