Bumpy roads to reconstruction

Bumpy roads to reconstruction

In the latest issue of BRANZ's Build Magazine, a recent QuakeCoRE project involving researchers from Resilient Organisations, the University of Auckland and Market Economics, address the question of what differentiates the earthquake rebuilding timeline of Christchurch from other places like Kobe following the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake and Los Angeles following the 1994 Northridge earthquake?

To find the answer, and to assist in improving the ability to resource future construction, the project team looked at the progress of restoring and rebuilding homes, infrastructure facilities and commercial buildings in Christchurch following the 2010/11 Canterbury earthquakes.

The longitudinal study of earthquake recovery in Christchurch suggested there is a delay in construction demand landing for real construction, which caused incorrect demand perception. Therefore, three essential components should be considered by the government agency and construction industry bodies taking the lead on disaster recovery for future disaster reconstruction planning:

  • A real-time, transparent, cross-sector construction information and intelligence reporting system – not using lagging metrics – that can be publicly accessible, especially for construction businesses.
  • Reduced lead time from intentions of spending to real construction.
  • Increased visibility of construction pipelines.

Read the full article

Queenstown Tourism Operators getting prepared

Queenstown Tourism Operators getting prepared

By Erica Seville (Resilient Organisations) and Trevor Andrews (Emergency Management Otago)
May 2019

This month, Erica Seville, spent an afternoon with the Queenstown Lakes district TORQUE group.  TORQUE (which stands for Tourism Operator Responders of Queenstown), brings together the largest tourism operators in the district, along with the Department of Conservation, the Queenstown Lakes District Council, and Emergency Management Otago, to collectively address the challenge of looking after up to 75,000 visitors in a major disaster.  These visitors underpin the district’s economic prosperity, but also create one of Otago’s biggest challenges in planning for a major event response.  In peak summer and winter periods, there can be up to two visitors for every local in area!

TORQUE members have committed to planning to look after their clients as well as their staff in a major event.  This includes making provision to shelter clients “in place” if necessary, and providing logistical support for moving and possibly evacuating affected people and communities.  This is underpinned by ensuring that their own staff are well prepared and trained for emergencies, and that their business continuity plans are thorough and well exercised.

In her session with the TORQUE group, Erica focused on practical strategies to use within their own organisations, and collectively as a sector, to build engagement and momentum for resilience building activities, and prioritise areas of focus.  “A well-prepared Tourism Operators sector can be a fantastic resource for the region.  They have a fleet of helicopters, 4WD vehicles, boats, and radio communications, as well as trained staff used to dealing with people and operating in extreme and often remote conditions.  There are also opportunities to leverage the skills and capabilities of visitors in the area at the time of an event.   Thinking through, in advance, how to appropriately tap into this visitor resource shifts our frame of reference from seeing visitors as a logistical challenge, to being a potential opportunity for supporting the Queenstown Lakes region during response and recovery.”

Ellie Kay shortlisted for GRRN Young Researchers Award

Ellie Kay shortlisted for GRRN Young Researcher Award

Congratulations to Ellie Kay for being one of just five young researchers invited to compete for the Global Resilience Research Network (GRRN) Young Researchers Award.

Ellie has been invited to attend the GRRN summit in Freiburg, Germany in April to present her research. The GRRN Young Researchers Trophy will be judged and awarded at the summit.

Read Ellie’s research abstract

Expert Opinions on New Zealand Resilience Index

Resilience to Nature's Challenges

Expert opinions on the New Zealand Resilience Index

The Trajectories Toolbox of the Resilience to Nature’s Challenges Kia manawaroa – Ngā Ākina o Te Ao Tūroa National Science Challenge (RNC-NSC) has been working on the development of the New Zealand Resilience Index (NZRI), which measures place-based community resilience. The index uses a multi-capital model, including indicators of resilience in the built and natural environment, social, cultural, governance, and economic domains. However, some indicators of resilience may contribute more to the measurement of resilience outcomes than others. To understand this, we conducted an expert weighting exercise, eliciting the views of resilience and disaster risk reduction academics and practitioners working in New Zealand.

Indicators relating to the built environment were ranked as the most important, with building safety and functionality following a disruption weighted most highly (11.7%). This was closely followed by network infrastructure resilience (11.5%). Indicators related to social and human capital were also rated relatively high, with levels of community networks and sense of belonging and personal resilience capacities of individuals contributing 11.3% and 10.5% respectively. Indicators in the cultural and natural environment spaces were deemed as contributing less to resilience outcomes than built and social indicators. Experts weighted the item heritage and culture are valued and preserved as contributing the least (4.7%), followed by community access to shelters and welfare (5.3%), and availability of natural buffers (6.2%).

 

Table 1. Indicators and indicator weights following the expert weighting exercise.

 

Capital Indicator Part-worth utility
Built Buildings safety and functionality following a disruption* 11.7%
Built Network infrastructure resilience (roads, electricity, water and waste water) 11.5%
Social Levels of community networks and sense of belonging 11.3%
Social Personal resilience capacities of individuals (e.g., education, physical and mental wellbeing) 10.5%
Gov. Health system response capacity 8.9%
Econ. Household capacity to cope with economic disruption 8.9%
Gov. Quality of legislation and plans addressing hazards 8.0%
DRR Household emergency preparedness 6.7%
Econ. Economic diversity (businesses from several different sectors) 6.4%
Natural Availability of natural buffers (e.g., green space, undeveloped flood plains) 6.2%
DRR Community access to shelters and welfare centres* 5.3%
Culture Heritage and culture are valued and preserved 4.7%
* indicator not currently included in the NZRI due to a lack of nationally consistent data

Perhaps one of the more interesting weightings was the comparatively low level of importance given to community access to shelters and welfare centres. However, this could be explained by the higher rating of buildings safety and functionality following a disruption as arguably shelters are less likely to be needed if buildings are safe and functional following an event. It is a reactive rather than a preventative contributor to resilience capacities. The weights of all indicators included in the expert weighting exercise are outlined fully in Table 1.

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If you have any questions or comments about this bulletin please contact Dr Joanne Stevenson, [email protected].

Resilience to nature’s challenges researchers want to make resilience visible

Resilience to nature’s challenges researchers want to make resilience visible

The human brain processes information visually. How can we help people see resilience? Stories. Photos. Displaying layers of data on a map.

The trajectories toolbox has ammased a bank of over 400 indicators that have been used to capture some aspect of resilience to disruption in the complex systems that make up life in New Zealand. Seeing-the-invisbleThese indicators are being matched to available data and will be geocoded in a way that will allow us to see the differences across space and time.

As the saying goes “what gets measured gets done”. When communities are able to set targets and track their progress it motivates action. Researchers, communities, and resilience practitioners will be able to mine existing public data in a resilience context to assess their strengths, weaknesses, assets, and capabilities. The trajectories toolbox will also continue to work across the challenge working with community based co-creation partners and with Government players needing to track progress toward the National Resilience Plan and the Sendai Framework for Action.

Read more about the Resilience to Nature's Challenge Resilience Trajectories Toolbox Project

Creating future ready farm businesses

Creating future ready farm businesses

Earlier this month, the North Canterbury Drought Response Committee, in collaboration with Resilient Organisations and Fraser Pastoral, held a workshop for a group of farmers in the Hurunui District of Canterbury.

The workshop focused on how farmers could build their capacity now to navigate future turbulence.

Farmers in North Canterbury have recently faced serious adversity with a three-year drought, earthquakes, and shifting public perceptions of farming. The workshop was a chance for farmers to take time out from their day-to day operations and focus on big picture strategy. It gave them tools to change their approach to future disruptions from setbacks to opportunities for innovation and growth. The attendees came with open minds, generated thoughtful discussion, and demonstrated a clear readiness and growing capacity to lead their businesses into the future.

Read the report from the workshop