Organisational Resilience

ISCRAM Conference, Wellington, November 2018

The inaugural ISCRAM (International Association for Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management) Asia Pacific regional conference is being held in Wellington from the 4th to 7th November 2018, and Resilient Organisations is excited to be supporting the conference.

The theme for the conference is Innovating for Resilience, and the programme will cover all of the major topics in information systems for crisis response and management, ranging from the technical to the social and including data, applications, social media and alerting and monitoring systems.

Visit the ISCRAM Conference website for more information and to register online

Improving resilience to natural disasters: West Coast lifelines vulnerability and interdependency

Improving Resilience to Natural Disasters: West Coast Lifelines Vulnerability and Interdependency

David Elms, Ian McCahon and Rob Dewhirst have been taking a fresh approach to evaluating infrastructure resilience investment priorities for West Coast communities.

By looking at the West Coast’s infrastructure as a system, they identify vulnerabilities that prevent ‘flow’ through that system and the importance of each critical pipeline of flow to the West Coast economy and community. Investment priorities are ranked according to their contribution to community resilience; thus infrastructure resilience and community resilience both contribute to the final results.

It is a really interesting approach, which takes a systemic view of resilience investment priorities.

The report is available below, along with the 12 supplementary documents.

Incentivising organisational resilience

Incentivising organisational resilience

Businesses need to believe they are going to be impacted, that they can reduce this impact through their own actions, and that it is an essential part of business to do so.  Those who believe these things invest in resilience.  However, it is not enough to rely on the ‘enlightenment’ of businesses to act in their own self-interest.   Businesses must be actively nudged and supported.

In June 2017, the National Emergency Management Conference was held in Wellington, with presentations addressing the future of emergency management in New Zealand.  Bryce Davies, the General Manager Corporate Relations at IAG (Insurance Australia Group Ltd.), spoke about resilience as a national issue, where public, private, and civil society organisations must be able to thrive in times of crisis.  But how do we incentivise organisations to be more resilient?

In his presentation, Davies begins by outlining the benefits and limitations of insurance products to support organisational resilience.  Insurance plays a part in building resilience in organisations, yet only 20-30% of businesses have business interruption insurance.  Resilience requires a broad consideration of risks and impacts and how they are managed.  Ultimately, insurance can provide a backstop for organisations in the form of financial assistance, but cannot stop things from going wrong.

What is needed, Davies says, is belief.

Businesses need to believe they are going to be impacted, that they can reduce this impact through their own actions, and that it is an essential part of business to do so.  Those who believe these things invest in resilience.  However, it is not enough to rely on the ‘enlightenment’ of businesses to act in their own self-interest.

Davies provides three suggestions to get organisations to react, and invest in building resilience.

  1.  LEADERSHIP
    Resilience needs led by organisations like MBIE, Business NZ, Resilient Organisations, and local government.  By promoting resilience and providing supporting information, resilience becomes a normal part of business and everyday conversation.
  2. INCENTIVES
    Incentivise organisational resilience is through positive pressure.  A range of public and private sector mechanisms already exist, but they're not used for this purpose.  Regulators and industry groups need to think about how to use the levers at their disposal to drive resilience.
  3.  SEEDING ACTION
    The final suggestion is seeding action.  Here the example given was Government could require the development of sector-wide plans to ensure that services are still provided in times of crisis.  The alignment this would require across agencies and between public and private organisations would draw businesses in and move people away from a traditional focus on response.

The key takeaway from the presentation is that we cannot rely on enlightened businesses to act on resilience.  Businesses must be actively nudged and supported.

Watch full presentation

Learning new creative strategies for designing and facilitating learning experiences

Learning new creative strategies for designing and facilitating learning experiences

How much time do we spend ‘perfecting’ a report, or a proposal, or any of our outputs only to find we were answering the wrong question? Or that our solution did not gel with those meant to be served?

Design Thinking offers a new way of approaching problems that can help us to avoid these issues and ensure that our work is making a meaningful difference.  Although often thought of as ‘product’ related, design thinking concepts can be used to aid better practice in education, research and consulting.

Tracy Hatton has just returned from an intensive 4-day boot camp at the Hasso Plattner School of Design at Stanford University.  This program inspires new ways of understanding and tackling challenges with a core focus on ensuring a human centric approach to problem definition and solution ideation.

We are excited to see how some of the concepts might help in building more resilient organisations.

Creating future ready farm businesses

Creating future ready farm businesses

Earlier this month, the North Canterbury Drought Response Committee, in collaboration with Resilient Organisations and Fraser Pastoral, held a workshop for a group of farmers in the Hurunui District of Canterbury.

The workshop focused on how farmers could build their capacity now to navigate future turbulence.

Farmers in North Canterbury have recently faced serious adversity with a three-year drought, earthquakes, and shifting public perceptions of farming. The workshop was a chance for farmers to take time out from their day-to day operations and focus on big picture strategy. It gave them tools to change their approach to future disruptions from setbacks to opportunities for innovation and growth. The attendees came with open minds, generated thoughtful discussion, and demonstrated a clear readiness and growing capacity to lead their businesses into the future.

Read the report from the workshop

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