EarthEx

EARTH EX - Global resilience exercise

The virtual multi-sector global resilience exercise EARTH EX opens on 21 August 2019 and remains open to participate in any time through to the end of October. The ResOrgs team have registered and will be taking part in this exercise. and we encourage organisations to register and take part.

What is it?

As a way to build resilience for large and small organisations, EARTH EX is a unique opportunity to test your response to a major power outage and better anticipate and prepare for such an event.

Our infrastructure is interconnected and interdependent. A major incident in one location can cascade rapidly and have an impact on critical infrastructure systems elsewhere, affecting their ability to function, to connect communities, provide essential services, or to protect society.

How well prepared are we as a society for such an event? How prepared is your organisation? How prepared are you?

As a multi-sector international exercise, EarthEX offers a scenario that contributes to a growing understanding about the interdependencies of your organisation and the wider impact on all of your stakeholders including your employees.

EARTH EX uses video simulations to set the scene for the exercise based around a real-world threat-based scenario.

Register at https://www.eiscouncil.org/EarthEx.aspx

Bumpy roads to reconstruction

Bumpy roads to reconstruction

In the latest issue of BRANZ's Build Magazine, a recent QuakeCoRE project involving researchers from Resilient Organisations, the University of Auckland and Market Economics, address the question of what differentiates the earthquake rebuilding timeline of Christchurch from other places like Kobe following the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake and Los Angeles following the 1994 Northridge earthquake?

To find the answer, and to assist in improving the ability to resource future construction, the project team looked at the progress of restoring and rebuilding homes, infrastructure facilities and commercial buildings in Christchurch following the 2010/11 Canterbury earthquakes.

The longitudinal study of earthquake recovery in Christchurch suggested there is a delay in construction demand landing for real construction, which caused incorrect demand perception. Therefore, three essential components should be considered by the government agency and construction industry bodies taking the lead on disaster recovery for future disaster reconstruction planning:

  • A real-time, transparent, cross-sector construction information and intelligence reporting system – not using lagging metrics – that can be publicly accessible, especially for construction businesses.
  • Reduced lead time from intentions of spending to real construction.
  • Increased visibility of construction pipelines.

Read the full article

Queenstown Tourism Operators getting prepared

Queenstown Tourism Operators getting prepared

By Erica Seville (Resilient Organisations) and Trevor Andrews (Emergency Management Otago)
May 2019

This month, Erica Seville, spent an afternoon with the Queenstown Lakes district TORQUE group.  TORQUE (which stands for Tourism Operator Responders of Queenstown), brings together the largest tourism operators in the district, along with the Department of Conservation, the Queenstown Lakes District Council, and Emergency Management Otago, to collectively address the challenge of looking after up to 75,000 visitors in a major disaster.  These visitors underpin the district’s economic prosperity, but also create one of Otago’s biggest challenges in planning for a major event response.  In peak summer and winter periods, there can be up to two visitors for every local in area!

TORQUE members have committed to planning to look after their clients as well as their staff in a major event.  This includes making provision to shelter clients “in place” if necessary, and providing logistical support for moving and possibly evacuating affected people and communities.  This is underpinned by ensuring that their own staff are well prepared and trained for emergencies, and that their business continuity plans are thorough and well exercised.

In her session with the TORQUE group, Erica focused on practical strategies to use within their own organisations, and collectively as a sector, to build engagement and momentum for resilience building activities, and prioritise areas of focus.  “A well-prepared Tourism Operators sector can be a fantastic resource for the region.  They have a fleet of helicopters, 4WD vehicles, boats, and radio communications, as well as trained staff used to dealing with people and operating in extreme and often remote conditions.  There are also opportunities to leverage the skills and capabilities of visitors in the area at the time of an event.   Thinking through, in advance, how to appropriately tap into this visitor resource shifts our frame of reference from seeing visitors as a logistical challenge, to being a potential opportunity for supporting the Queenstown Lakes region during response and recovery.”

Shakeout Preparedness Tips for Business

Shakeout Preparedness Tips for Business

New Zealand ShakeOut, our national earthquake drill and tsunami hīkoi, is taking place on Thursday 18 October 2018 at 9:30 am.

ShakeOut is held across the world to remind people of the right action to take during an earthquake, Drop, Cover and Hold - and to practise a tsunami hīkoi (evacuation) if in a coastal area.

With the ShakeOut exercise coming up, it is a good reminder for businesses to improve their preparedness.

Resilient Organisations have put together a few tips and simple actions organisations can do to significantly improve their resilience and preparedness.

Download the ShakeOut Preparedness Tips

If you are a New Zealand organisation and want to find out more about ShakeOut and how to participate, go to the ShakeOut website, www.shakeout.govt.nz.

ISCRAM Conference, Wellington, November 2018

The inaugural ISCRAM (International Association for Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management) Asia Pacific regional conference is being held in Wellington from the 4th to 7th November 2018, and Resilient Organisations is excited to be supporting the conference.

The theme for the conference is Innovating for Resilience, and the programme will cover all of the major topics in information systems for crisis response and management, ranging from the technical to the social and including data, applications, social media and alerting and monitoring systems.

Visit the ISCRAM Conference website for more information and to register online

Improving resilience to natural disasters: West Coast lifelines vulnerability and interdependency

Improving Resilience to Natural Disasters: West Coast Lifelines Vulnerability and Interdependency

David Elms, Ian McCahon and Rob Dewhirst have been taking a fresh approach to evaluating infrastructure resilience investment priorities for West Coast communities.

By looking at the West Coast’s infrastructure as a system, they identify vulnerabilities that prevent ‘flow’ through that system and the importance of each critical pipeline of flow to the West Coast economy and community. Investment priorities are ranked according to their contribution to community resilience; thus infrastructure resilience and community resilience both contribute to the final results.

It is a really interesting approach, which takes a systemic view of resilience investment priorities.

The report is available below, along with the 12 supplementary documents.

Incentivising organisational resilience

Incentivising organisational resilience

Businesses need to believe they are going to be impacted, that they can reduce this impact through their own actions, and that it is an essential part of business to do so.  Those who believe these things invest in resilience.  However, it is not enough to rely on the ‘enlightenment’ of businesses to act in their own self-interest.   Businesses must be actively nudged and supported.

In June 2017, the National Emergency Management Conference was held in Wellington, with presentations addressing the future of emergency management in New Zealand.  Bryce Davies, the General Manager Corporate Relations at IAG (Insurance Australia Group Ltd.), spoke about resilience as a national issue, where public, private, and civil society organisations must be able to thrive in times of crisis.  But how do we incentivise organisations to be more resilient?

In his presentation, Davies begins by outlining the benefits and limitations of insurance products to support organisational resilience.  Insurance plays a part in building resilience in organisations, yet only 20-30% of businesses have business interruption insurance.  Resilience requires a broad consideration of risks and impacts and how they are managed.  Ultimately, insurance can provide a backstop for organisations in the form of financial assistance, but cannot stop things from going wrong.

What is needed, Davies says, is belief.

Businesses need to believe they are going to be impacted, that they can reduce this impact through their own actions, and that it is an essential part of business to do so.  Those who believe these things invest in resilience.  However, it is not enough to rely on the ‘enlightenment’ of businesses to act in their own self-interest.

Davies provides three suggestions to get organisations to react, and invest in building resilience.

  1.  LEADERSHIP
    Resilience needs led by organisations like MBIE, Business NZ, Resilient Organisations, and local government.  By promoting resilience and providing supporting information, resilience becomes a normal part of business and everyday conversation.
  2. INCENTIVES
    Incentivise organisational resilience is through positive pressure.  A range of public and private sector mechanisms already exist, but they're not used for this purpose.  Regulators and industry groups need to think about how to use the levers at their disposal to drive resilience.
  3.  SEEDING ACTION
    The final suggestion is seeding action.  Here the example given was Government could require the development of sector-wide plans to ensure that services are still provided in times of crisis.  The alignment this would require across agencies and between public and private organisations would draw businesses in and move people away from a traditional focus on response.

The key takeaway from the presentation is that we cannot rely on enlightened businesses to act on resilience.  Businesses must be actively nudged and supported.

Watch full presentation