DIVE Platform – the key to New Zealand’s exciting resilience innovations

DIVE Platform – the key to New Zealand’s exciting resilience innovations

ResOrgs researchers, Dr Joanne Stevenson and Ellie Kay have been busy working with a team of researchers creating a new platform that will help researchers make better use of New Zealand’s Disaster Risk Reduction and resilience data.

The collaborative team of researchers, funded by Resilience to Nature’s Challenges Kia manawaroa – Ngā Ākina o Te Ao Tūroa and QuakeCoRE – New Zealand Centre for Earthquake Resilience, developed the platform after identifying a gap in the industry. “Across the country there are datasets from extensive, ongoing research on disaster risk reduction and resilience, but no integrated way to share and search that information” said Dr Joanne Stevenson, team lead for the project.

After running a series of workshops to find out what stakeholders and researchers needed, the team developed the Data Integration and Visualisation En Masse (DIVE) Platform. The NZ Resilience DIVE Platform website gives users the ability to catalogue, discover, share, and use datasets and other information relevant to Disaster Risk Reduction and resilience in New Zealand. “DIVE provides, for the first time in New Zealand, a place where researchers can let others know about the data, publications, and ongoing research relevant to DRR and resilience” Dr Stevenson notes.

The platform can also host unique datasets, as well as being a place where those interested in DRR and resilience in New Zealand can connect and collaborate, forming virtual organisations for sharing information. DIVE also provides access to data literacy tools for those wanting to know more about metadata and spatial data, and why these things are important for a more resilient New Zealand.

The DIVE Platform can be accessed at resiliencedata.org.nz.

Researchers who choose to host their data on the platform can rest assured that it won’t be lost too. Should it be decommissioned, DIVE can be transferred to another host, such as data.govt.nz, as it has been created using the CKAN software platform.

The NZ Resilience DIVE Platform is created and maintained by Resilient Organisations and, ultimately, by New Zealand’s research community. As a sharing platform, this collaborative site provides a tool for transformational research, allowing for innovative new discoveries through the recycling of data. It is also hoped that DIVE can act as a catalogue or repository for information produced in disaster response and recovery contexts and can aid decision making in the wake of natural disasters.

Erica Seville appointed to the board of the Earthquake Commission (EQC)

Erica Seville appointed to the Earthquake Commision (EQC) Board

Congratulations to Resilient Organisations' Director, Erica Seville on her appointment as a Commissioner to the Earthquake Commision (EQC).

Having spent many years leading and mentoring a group of researchers and consultants working to make public and private sector organisations more resilient, Erica will bring a wealth of knowledge, insight, and a fresh perspective to this role.

Read the EQC news item

Oamaru Heritage Precinct workshop : future thinking for a thriving community

Oamaru Heritage Precinct workshop: future thinking for a thriving community

In February this year, a workshop was held in Oamaru to bring together heritage tourism stakeholders to explore future options for the town and its heritage precinct. Attendees included tenants from the heritage precinct, and members of the Waitaki District Council and Whitestone Civic Trust.

Funded by QuakeCoRE, the participatory decision-support workshop was run by Dr Caroline Orchiston and post-graduate student Will Stovall, from the University of Otago, in conjunction with Tracy Hatton, from Resilient Organisations.

Participants were invited to put aside their own agendas and consider the ‘bigger picture’ issues for Oamaru, with the overarching goal of creating ‘a thriving community for all’.

They were presented with five hypothetical projects that could benefit Oamaru. The projects were: the pedestrianisation of Harbour Street; the extension of the railway line; the installation of a proposed zipline; gaining world heritage status for Oamaru; and earthquake strengthening of heritage buildings.

The projects were then tested against three hypothetical situations to help determine which would stand up best against the scenarios if they happened in the near future.  The scenarios discussed among stakeholders included the decline of tourism in Oamaru, what would happen to the projects if a devastating earthquake struck the town, and how the projects would run if the tourism market remained the same.  Results showed that stakeholders preferred the pedestrianisation of Harbour Street and Oamaru pushing for world heritage status.

Although the intent of the workshop was not to reach any actual decisions, the project scores that emerged from the workshop provide Oamaru decision-makers with potentially interesting insights into how this group of participants perceived the future opportunities for Oamaru. Feedback from participants suggests that the structured process was very useful in working towards achieving a consensus and helping them to understand how collective decision-making can be achieved and the rationale behind decisions.

ISCRAM Conference, Wellington, November 2018

The inaugural ISCRAM (International Association for Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management) Asia Pacific regional conference is being held in Wellington from the 4th to 7th November 2018, and Resilient Organisations is excited to be supporting the conference.

The theme for the conference is Innovating for Resilience, and the programme will cover all of the major topics in information systems for crisis response and management, ranging from the technical to the social and including data, applications, social media and alerting and monitoring systems.

Visit the ISCRAM Conference website for more information and to register online

Improving resilience to natural disasters: West Coast lifelines vulnerability and interdependency

Improving Resilience to Natural Disasters: West Coast Lifelines Vulnerability and Interdependency

David Elms, Ian McCahon and Rob Dewhirst have been taking a fresh approach to evaluating infrastructure resilience investment priorities for West Coast communities.

By looking at the West Coast’s infrastructure as a system, they identify vulnerabilities that prevent ‘flow’ through that system and the importance of each critical pipeline of flow to the West Coast economy and community. Investment priorities are ranked according to their contribution to community resilience; thus infrastructure resilience and community resilience both contribute to the final results.

It is a really interesting approach, which takes a systemic view of resilience investment priorities.

The report is available below, along with the 12 supplementary documents.