News

Erica Seville shortlisted for a Continuity and Resilience Consultant 2017 Award at the BCI Australasian Awards

ResOrgs Managing Director, Erica Seville has been shortlisted for a Continuity and Resilience Consultant 2017 Award at the BCI Australasian Awards.  

This is a well deserved recognition of Erica's continuing work leading and mentoring a group of researchers and consultants working to make public and private sector organisations more resilient.  Alongside this, in 2016, Erica published a book; Resilient Organisations: How to Survive, Thrive and Create Opportunities Through Crisis and Change.  

Australasian-Awards ShortliThe BCI Australian Awards are an annual celebration of the best, brightest and most innovative in the continuity and resilience industry across the region. The BCI note that they are designed to recognise the individuals and organizations who have excelled in the field of business continuity and resilience throughout the year. The Awards are one of seven regional awards hosted by the BCI each year, which culminate in the annual Global Awards, held in November during the Institute’s annual conference in London, England. 

The winners of the awards will be announced at a Gala Dinner and Ceremony to be held in Sydney on the 31st August 2017.

 

Learning new creative strategies for designing and facilitating learning experiences

How much time do we spend ‘perfecting’ a report, or a proposal, or any of our outputs only to find we were answering the wrong question? Or that our solution did not gel with those meant to be served?  Design thinking

Design Thinking offers a new way of approaching problems that can help us to avoid these issues and ensure that our work is making a meaningful difference.  Although often thought of as ‘product’ related, design thinking concepts can be used to aid better practice in education, research and consulting.

Tracy Hatton has just returned from an intensive 4-day boot camp at the Hasso Plattner School of Design at Stanford University.  This program inspires new ways of understanding and tackling challenges with a core focus on ensuring a human centric approach to problem definition and solution ideation.

We are excited to see how some of the concepts might help in building more resilient organisations. 

 

Creating future ready farm businesses

Earlier this month, the North Canterbury Drought Response Committee, in collaboration with Resilient Organisations and Fraser Pastoral, held a workshop for a group of farmers in the Hurunui District of Canterbury.
 
The workshop focused on how farmers could build their capacity now to navigate future turbulence.
 
Farmers in North Canterbury have recently faced serious adversity with a three-year drought, earthquakes, and shifting public perceptions of farming. The workshop was a chance for farmers to take time out from their day-to day operations and focus on big picture strategy. It gave them tools to change their approach to future disruptions from setbacks to opportunities for innovation and growth. The attendees came with open minds, generated thoughtful discussion, and demonstrated a clear readiness and growing capacity to lead their businesses into the future.

Read the report from the workshop

Upcoming event: 2017 Organisational Resilience Conference

The 2017 Organisational Resilience Conference is being held in Auckland on 22-23 August 2017, with the conference theme being crisis and continuity leadership for the modern organisation.

Resilient Organisations is supporting the conference, and ResOrgs Senior Research Consultant, Joanne Stevenson will be speaking at the conference.

We are pleased to be able to offer a 10% discount to firends of ResOrgs. Please use the code M8GGS4 when registering for the event online.

 

Resilience to Nature’s Challenges Researchers want to Make Resilience Visible

The human brain processes information visually.  How can we help people see resilience? Stories. Photos. Displaying layers of data on a map.

The trajectories toolbox has ammased a bank of over 400 indicators that have been used to capture some aspect of resilience to disruption in the complex systems that make up life in New Zealand.  Seeing-the-invisbleThese indicators are being matched to available data and will be geocoded in a way that will allow us to see the differences across space and time. 

Read more...

Latest Report: Kaikoura Earthquake Social Science Research Workshop

Our latest report summarises the Kaikoura Earthquake Social Science Research Workshop held in February this year and lessons learned about research collaboration, coordination,and impact following major disruptive events.It includes the research and research coordination priorities for the Kaikoura earthquake and tsunami that were identified during the workshop.

View full report

No seriously, good research data management can increase resilience

ResOrgs Senior Research Consultant Joanne Stevenson spoke at events in March and May about the importance and challenges of measuring resilience in New Zealand. 

In addition to discussing the development of a composite index to quantify the disaster resilience of places in New Zealand, Joanne discussed the importance of data management.  It may not sound very exciting, but the outcomes of The National Science Challenges are cross-disciplinary, mission-led programmes. They require collaboration between researchers from academic Anchorinstitutions, Crown Research Institutes, businesses, and non-governmental organisations.  To make real progress on big problems researchers need to combine several pieces of research and lots of data.  These transformational outcomes will be facilitated by good research data management processes.

Download full powerpoint presentation

Upcoming Christchurch Event: Planning for a Crisis

On Thursday 8 June, 5.30-7.30pm, the Canterbury Employers Chamber of Commerce (CECC) are running a facilitated discussion on planning for a crisis with a panel of speakers, including ResOrgs' John Vargo. The discussion will give organisations an opportunity to hear real-life lessons, as well as tips and tactics on how to navigate through a crisis.

The event is free for CECC members and $30 per person for non-members.

 

Find out more and book online

Latest Research: Resilience and Data in New Zealand

Our latest Resilient Organisations report focuses on resilience and data in New Zealand. Thanks to funding from QuakeCoRE and the Resilience to Nature’s Challenges (RNC) – National Science Challenge, a small team of researchers from ResOrgs in collaboration with UC CEISMIC (the Canterbury Earthquake Digital Archive) have been investigating how to best enable teams of researchers to address complex social problems that will make New Zealand more resilient. The focus of this programme was to identify the types of data QuakeCoRE and RNC research teams would be using, how they planned to analyse and share that data, and how data management practices could enhance the impact of these research programmes.

View full report

Post Doctoral Research Vacancy

We are looking for a hard-working and enthusiastic person to join our team as a Post-Doctoral Researcher supporting social science research that fulfils the mission of Quake CoRE.

This is a fixed term position ending 31 December 2017. The position will be based in Christchurch, New Zealand.

QuakeCoRE is transforming the earthquake resilience of communities and societies, through innovative world‐class research, human capability development, and deep national and international collaborations. It is a Centre of Research Excellence (CoRE) funded by the New Zealand Tertiary Education Commission. This position will support research within the Flagship Five programme which focuses on determining how we decide where to invest our limited resources to most effectively improve New Zealand’s resilience to earthquakes. The successful candidate will focus on developing tools and techniques for aiding decision making on those investment priorities.

About Us

Resilient Organisations is a small research and consulting company that focuses on helping organisations, industries, and economies to thrive in any environment. We also specialise in developing and administering tools and strategies for strategic decision making and resilience assessment. As a social enterprise, we aim to maximize the positive social impact of our work.

What we do

We conduct robust, original research to understand and advance the ability of organisations and systems to anticipate and prepare for, proactively respond to, and recover effectively from disruptions of all kinds. Resilient Organisations also offers services direct to organisations including resilience benchmarking and advising on the best ways to improve resilience.

How we do it

We are a small team who believe work should be fun. We operate a flexible working environment to promote wellbeing inside and outside of work. Our values are key to the way we operate. We work collaboratively within our team, and with our partners, clients and funders to produce high quality, evidence based outputs that make a difference.

The role

In this role, you will work on projects relating to decision making around earthquake resilience. The main tasks will involve:

  • Reading, analysing and accurately synthesising complex material
  • Collecting data through interviews, surveys, and other means
  • Conducting analyses and summarising themes
  • Writing reports and articles for publication
  • Assisting the team in the co-creation of innovative approaches to research problems.

To be considered for this role, you need the ability to:

  • Present ideas clearly and concisely both verbally and in writing
  • Self-motivate to produce quality outputs in a timely manner
  • Work independently and collaborate remotely
  • Ask for help when needed and be comfortable in contributing to group discussions
  • Demonstrate proficiency in managing your own time to ensure projects are completed on time.
  • Effectively plan and maintain interest in long-term projects.

 The successful candidate will need:

  • A PhD from an accredited institution
  • An interest in earthquake resilience
  • A high level of proficiency in Word, Excel, Outlook
  • Some familiarity with referencing software (EndNote or Mendeley)

 To apply for this role, please email your CV and covering letter to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it by 15 April 2017. If you would like further information about the position or Resilient Organisations, please call Tracy Hatton on 021 160 7707.

ResOrgs Team Vacancy: Analyst/Research Consultant

We are looking for a hard-working and enthusiastic person to join our team as an Analyst /Research Consultant. The role will be be based in Christchurch, New Zealand.

About Us

Resilient Organisations is a small research and consulting company that focuses on helping organisations, industries, and economies to thrive in any environment. We also specialise in developing and administering tools and strategies for strategic decision making and resilience assessment. As a social enterprise, we aim to maximize the positive social impact of our work.

What we do

We conduct robust, original research to understand and advance the ability of organisations and systems to anticipate and prepare for, proactively respond to, and recover effectively from disruptions of all kinds. Resilient Organisations also offers services direct to organisations including resilience benchmarking and advising on the best ways to improve resilience.

How we do it

We are a small team who believe work should be fun. We operate a flexible working environment to promote wellbeing inside and outside of work. Our values are key to the way we operate. We work collaboratively within our team, and with our partners, clients and funders to produce high quality, evidence based outputs that make a difference.

The role

In this role, you will work across a variety of research and consulting projects. The main tasks will involve:

  • Reading, analysing and accurately synthesising complex material
  • Collecting data through interviews, surveys, and other means
  • Conducting analyses and summarising themes
  • Writing reports and articles for publication
  • Assisting the team in the co-creation of innovative approaches to client and research problems.

 To be considered for this role, you need the ability to:

  • Present ideas clearly and concisely both verbally and in writing
  • Self-motivate to produce quality outputs in a timely manner
  • Work independently and collaborate remotely
  • Ask for help when needed and be comfortable in contributing to group discussions
  • Switch readily between leading projects and supporting others
  • Demonstrate proficiency in managing your own time to ensure projects are completed on time.
  • Effectively plan and maintain interest in long-term projects.

 The successful candidate will need:

  • A bachelor’s degree and post-graduate qualification at the masters or higher level from an accredited institution
  • A high level of proficiency in Word, Excel, Outlook
  • Some familiarity with referencing software (EndNote or Mendeley)
  • Some familiarity with statistical analysis software (SPSS, R etc.)

To apply for this role, please email your CV and covering letter to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it by 15 April 2017. If you would like further information about the position or Resilient Organisations, please call Tracy Hatton on 021 160 7707.

QuakeCoRE PhD Scholarships

Applications for QuakeCoRE PhD Scholarships are now open. The deadline for applications is 5pm, Friday 28 April 2017. 
These scholarships are to support outstanding PhD students for projects within the scope of the QuakeCoRE research programme and mission.

 Two categories of scholarship support are available:

  1. 1.a 3 year PhD Scholarship
  2. 2.an up to 1 year PhD Extension Scholarship to cover the 4thyear of PhD study

 Please see QuakeCoRE Opportunities for details and the application form,

Erica Seville speaking on Community Resilience

During an APEC Supply Chain Resilience workshop last year, a series of TED-style talks were recorded, including ResOrgs' Erica Seville speaking on community resilience, and this is now available to view online.

A Primer in Resiliency: Seven Principles for Managing the Unexpected

This is a well worth a read for all those interested in building resilience in their organisation. The full article has been temporarily released to the general public until 31 May 2017.

Learn about the seven principles of resiliency, with practical suggestions for implementing each one, along with examples of companies that have managed to improve their operational effectiveness, even in time of crisis, by putting these precepts into practice.

Read full article

Article Review: Lessons from disaster: Creating a business continuity plan that really works

In this 2016 paper, Tracy Hatton and colleagues from Resilient Organisations examined the experiences of organisations with established Business Continuity Plans prior to the 2010-11 Canterbury earthquakes. Business Continuity Planning is a key component of a risk management process that enables organisations to manage the impacts of a disaster and maintain critical operations in the wake of disturbance. However, there is a scarcity of literature on the effectiveness of a Business Continuity Plan (BCP) in a real-word disaster setting. A recent survey from Resilient Organisations has shown that for businesses impacted by the Canterbury earthquakes, 60% of respondents found that a BCP was not a great aid. This contrasts with research from Japan, where over 70% of respondents found a BCP to be effective. varying sizes and from different sectors were selected as case studies. Researchers conducted interviews with senior representatives to gain an understanding of the impact of the 2010-11 Canterbury earthquakes and the effectiveness of the BCP components and processes.

Of the five organisations, three had extensive plans, one had an outline, and one smaller organisation had a conceptual plan. They all used a consequence-focused approach rather than a disaster-based approach, and focused on impacts to the organisation. The most effective elements of the plan were to understand critical functions, having an up-to-date communication plan, an effective back-up system, and regular training and testing. Less effective were plans used by two organisations which were lacking in detail, thereby hampering immediate action, and a plan that had too much detail, making it difficult to find relevant information quickly.

Organisations were also able to identify what was important to recovery but not included in the BCP, such as consideration of the impacts of the disaster on society and personal circumstances. A key takeaway from the study is that human resources must be considered alongside physical resources. Organisations need to focus on the well-being of employees in the wake of disaster, offering flexible working hours to allow for personal issues, and providing counselling and support as part of an effective BCP.

Read more...

A Resilient Supply Chain Trophy

The recipe for a resilient supply chain is not a combination of definitive strategies, but a broader network understanding, supportive culture, and quick decision making to enable a customised solution as per the situation.

Read more...

New PhD Opportunity at University of Canterbury

A new PhD scholarship is available in the Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand.  The PhD topic is "Quantitative System Dynamics Modelling of Organisational Health and Resilience of Infrastructure Service Providers”.   Suitable candidates will have a background in one or more of systems dynamics modelling, engineering, management and social science; as well as having excellent written and verbal communication skills.  For applicants with professional experience there is also an opportunity to contribute to teaching within the department.

A link to lodge an application will be posted soon.  If you have any queries, please contact Professor Mark Milke, email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Interested in joining the ResOrgs team?

We are looking for a Research Communications and Writing Assistant to join us.

 Resilient Organisations Ltd., a small research and consulting firm based at the University of Canterbury, is looking for a part-time writing assistant to collaborate on a variety of science communication projects. The assistant’s primary tasks will include working with Resilient Organisations’ researchers on the production of reports, journal articles, and presentations. Such tasks will necessarily include document proofreading, formatting, and the preparation and refinement of figures and graphics. We will also expect that the assistant spends time familiarising him or herself with the research and writing of Resilient Organisations’ researchers.

 The ideal candidate will have a research background and proven experience of publishing in an academic or government research context.  

 Fixed-term: March 1, 2017-May 31, 2017 (with the potential for renewal)

Hours: 10 hours minimum, up to 20 hours per week during busy periods

Remuneration: $20-40/ hour depending on experience.

 Requirements:

  • Graduate level tertiary degree or equivalent work experience in a research role.
  • Proven track record of publication and/or report preparation.
  • Able to attend in-person Tuesday meetings on the University of Canterbury Ilam campus.
  • Able to provide own computer and workspace.

 The candidate should be personable, able to effectively communicate with Resilient Organisations’ researchers, and interested in resilience, business, and/or systems-research.  

 How to apply:

Please contact Dr. Joanne Stevenson by email ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). In your email attach:

  • A cover letter of no more than 1 page of A4;
  • You full curriculum vitae;
  • The contact details of two referees;
  • Two or three examples of your best written work.

Applications close February 22, 2017.

Chips-and-Salsa Standard for Exercises

This is a very readable article from Nathaniel Forbes, Forbes Calamity Prevention - well worth a read for all those involved in running table top exercises and emergency planning exercises.


 

Could you – would you? – run a table top exercise at a conference for participants who had no crisis management experience? Would you choose cocktail hour to try?

I did. It was fun. And instructive.

I usually run table top exercises the way you probably do: assemble those responsible for executing an existing plan in a room; show some slides to set the scene; use a Master Event List (MEL) to manage ‘injects’ or ‘drips’ (event developments); coach a few role players; facilitate a ‘hot wash’ afterward to collect reactions; follow-up with a few pages of sagacious recommendations. And an invoice.

In a professional exercise, participants already know their roles and responsibilities. They don’t expect instructions; they expect challenges.

The sixty (60) players in this exercise, however, were disaster researchers letting their academic credentials down at the end of a three-day conference. The organizer’s objective was to give participants “a feel for what a table top exercise is like”, warning me that “very few” of them had ever participated in one. Each worked at a different educational institution, and so had no common plan or frame-of-reference. Some worked outside the U.S., so English language proficiency was also a challenge.

I spent a lot of time considering scenarios, but all had the same, fatal flaw: none of the participants would have any idea how to respond unless I told them how. How could that be done 90 minutes? Over vodka-and-tonics?

Struggling as the date of the event crept up, I talked with Dr. Robert Kay at Incept Labs in Australia who offered a simple, blinding insight:

“It’s not an exercise. It’s entertainment.”

Continue reading full article

Rural Resilience PhD Scholarship Opportunity

Applications are invited for a fully-funded 3-year doctoral scholarship, focusing on rural resilience in New Zealand. Based at the University of Canterbury, this PhD research will form part of the Resilience to Nature’s Challenges programme (National Science Challenge), across both the Rural Priority Co-Creation Laboratory and the Economics toolbox. Resilience to Nature’s Challenges is a ten-year programme of research focussed on building New Zealand’s resilience to natural hazards including slow and rapid onset events (e.g. earthquakes, wild fire, volcanoes, climate change, drought). 

Find out more

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